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May 16, 2019

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The important thing is: how do they smell? I think a strong scent is the most important thing when choosing roses.

Well, that Mr. Lincoln issue is disappointing. Hopefully you can find a true plant for HH to enjoy.

That is a bummer on the Mr. Lincoln. They usually smell wonderful. Any chance the nursery would make an exchange or give you a deal on a replacement if that is what you want to do? Stores seem to be pretty proud of their Mr. Lincoln plants.

Liz & Ingineer--After my stint at the gym, this morning, I drove on up to the nursery. I had two issues: 1) Mr Lincoln and 2) the dogwood tree planted 4/5/2018 that looks mostly dead, now. In my dealings with them (since 1968), they have always been more than fair with me. They even replaced a bare-root cherry tree that had failed to thrive after I planted it! (The replacement is within 10-14 days of having a bountiful crop ready for picking.) With me, today, I took photos and a blossom off of the "Mr Lincoln". I was greeted by John, with whom I've been dealing for the past 30 years (the guys with whom I dealt before 1990 have died off!)

I asked John if he could identify the rose blossom for me. Said he, "I'll bet that was labeled as a Mr Lincoln!" It seems that a whole batch of roses had been mislabeled. We went through their rose stock, which was bereft of Mr Lincolns, and I picked out an "Oklahoma" tea rose which is a deeper red than Mr Lincoln (and highly aromatic, Liz). Then they brought the guy (Josh) who had evaluated my dogwood tree (and thought it needed replacing) when he planted my Texas Whitebud, in out of the field.

Josh had thought he was waiting on me and I had thought that I was waiting on him. I had told him that he should pick out a Prairie Pink Dogwood for me. He hadn't taken me seriously and was waiting for me to come in to pick out my tree. They had but five specimens in stock (balled & burlapped) from which we chose one. I told him that I was willing to pay the "planting charge" since he planned that I should keep both trees. (He wants to move the "old" one to another location and put the "new" one into its place, but I told him we should leave the "old" one where it is. Moving it, again, may be the straw that makes that last live branch die!) We will haggle over how much I pay after he has another chance to evaluate the "old" tree.

Bogie--As if I didn't already have thousands of them, I bought a bunch of sedums (32 plants, I think - tiny plants) while at the nursery, then high-tailed it home. I got the Oklahoma rose planted and the bird feeders filled just in time to beat the storm that was threatening. You probably know that Texas and Oklahoma are really in trouble with the weather, today and tomorrow. We shall probably have more flooding during that time period, ourselves.

Next spring, when Hillside Nursery gets its 2020 roses in, I'll go buy another Mr Lincoln for your dad and place it where the imposter now resides. Not sure what I'll do with the imposter (of which the nursery had several in stock - from which they had removed "Mr Lincoln" tags). The blossoms are a lovely buttery cream color when open, (but I can detect not a whiff of scent from them, Liz). With the red Mr Lincoln and the darker red Oklahoma, I think your dad will be pleased. (He's not complaining over the roses that are now blooming!)

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